Congressional Quiet Skies Caucus Letter To FAA Administrator Steve Dickson re DNL65

Currently, FAA law has extremely complicated rules for establishing a noise boundary around airports. (A noise boundary is a geographic area inside which there is a certain acceptable noise level.) This is referred to as the DNL65. and it has several major flaws. The FAA Reauthorization Act Of 2018 attempted to address these flaws in several ways. This letter, from a caucus of Congressmen engaged on airport community issues complains to the Administrator that the spirit of the law is not being adhered to and demands that he make attempts to put his agency into compliance.

The language is fairly technical, however there are a couple of basic points they raise: First, that the noise boundary be determined by actual noise measurements (currently the noise boundaries are ‘modeled’ and those calculations often do not reflect in any way the lived experience for residents.) Second, that the ‘acceptable’ noise level of sixty five decibels (hence DNL65) has been determined to be far too high to conform with current understandings of healthy living.

HR 5874 – Decrease Noise Levels Act

116th CONGRESS 2d Session H. R. 5874   To require the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration to amend regulations concerning the day-night average sound level, and for other purposes. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES February 12, 2020 Ms. Meng (for herself, Mr. Smith of Washington, Mr. Espaillat, Ms. Brownley of California, Mr. Beyer, Mr.

HR 5874 – Decrease Noise Levels Act

[Congressional Bills 116th Congress] [From the U.S. Government Publishing Office] [H.R. 5874 Introduced in House (IH)] 116th CONGRESS 2d Session H. R. 5874 To require the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration to amend regulations concerning the day-night average sound level, and for other purposes. _______________________________________________________________________ IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES February 12, 2020 Ms.

Port Package Problems?

Over the past thirty years roughly 9,600 homes have received noise mitigation retro-fits from the Port Of Seattle in the form of windows and insulation. These are generally known as ‘Port Packages’ and were granted in exchange for the homeowner signing an Avigation Easement. Background The eligibility for a Port Package was determined by a